Dr. Jae Osenbach

Jae Osenbach, Ph.D. is a research psychologist and subject matter expert with the Mobile Health Program at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2).

The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Center for Telehealth & Technology, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

 

Attack of the Selfies

The other day I was sitting in my physician’s waiting room, when I noticed a young lady taking pictures of herself (“selfies"). My doctor’s waiting room is for the entire clinic, including the behavioral health services. Since the topic of stigma is so often broached in the psychological field, I got to thinking about how I would feel if I were a patient here to see a therapist, instead of my general doctor. What if I didn’t want anyone to know that I was here? What if I accidentally ended up in the selfies she posts on Facebook or Twitter? What if someone recognized me?

Mobile Health Research Highlight: Studies on Mobile Apps

It’s been awhile since we’ve highlighted recent mobile health research, and 2013 looks like it’s turning out to be the year to research health-related mobile apps! In the last six months there has been a blossoming of peer-reviewed articles published on the benefits of mobile apps for improving health. These studies examined apps for tracking weight loss, diabetes, mood problems, sleep problems, asthma, and medication management.

Tracked Health

There’s a new trend going on in the mobile health world that’s definitely worth looking into – health trackers. No, I’m not talking about the grizzly-haired grandpas looking for furry creatures to make coats. I’m talking about recent increase in small portable devices that can be used to track your sleep patterns, physical activity and other data, such as the FitBit® Flex™, Nike+® FuelBand™, or JawBone® Up™ . I’m personally interested in tracking my sleep pattern, and there are several smartphone and tablet apps available that can do just that.

The Other Side of the Stigma Coin

Lately we’ve focused on discussing how providers can embrace the mobile technology world and we’ve been advocating for the use of mobile apps and electronic devices within patient care. Today I want to discuss the other side of that coin: patient stigma toward the use of mobile apps for sensitive issues.

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