The Mobile Health Blog

If you spend any time with children you know how easy it is for them to adapt to new technology. Have you noticed toddlers trying to swipe the TV screen? How about asking you to “pause” a conversation? It’s no wonder that parents are turning to mobile devices to help supplement educational needs.

Here at T2 we’re working on helping those who work directly with patients make better use of our mobile applications. A few weeks ago, Dr.

Behavioral health clinicians may be hesitant to introduce technological options into therapy for many reasons. They may connect the use of some new technology, like mobile apps, solely with entertainment purposes such as games (e.g., Angry Birds).

When our mHealth program director began talking about “Big Data”, I have to admit the first thing that came to mind was an enormous, gold-skinned android (you other Star Trek geeks understand this).

A recent poll by Mitchell Research reports that over 75% of baby boomers have downloaded at least one mHealth app for their smartphones, and almost half have downloaded six or more.

Good mobile apps have features that users want to access many times, in many locations. Read further for tips on building apps that engage patients.

Improve the standard.

With the explosion of mobile apps on the market, clinicians now have at their fingertips some incredible tools for improving care for their patients. Now, I’m not talking about using Angry Birds in therapy. I’m talking about legitimate, well-made apps that integrate evidence-based practices.

If you own an iPhone, iPad or iPod you are probably among those that anxiously awaited the release of Apple's much hyped iTunes 11. Now that it's arrived the reception has been mixed. Some users love it; others hate it.

Welcome to the National Center for Telehealth & Technology’s (T2) weekly Mobile Health Blog featuring timely mHealth news from military, industry and academic quarters. Mobile health represents an integrated system of health care in which health data become interoperable among patients, providers, and electronic records. Providers can educate and render care when and where it is needed.

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