The Mobile Health Blog

Exercise, mental health days, proper nutrition – sure, providers know how to take care of themselves. The hard part is actually following through.

If you’re like most people, you primarily learn about and download apps from the two goliaths of the mobile app world: iTunes and Google Play.

Working with patients with neurocognitive deficits demands flexibility, creativity and persistence on the part of the clinician. It’s the job of the clinician to understand each patient’s unique set of strengths and weaknesses in the development of a therapy program.

So your organization is starting a blog about your area of health care. Of course, I think blogs can be a great addition to traditional standards of care. Blogs are an excellent way to deliver health information quickly to a broad audience.

One of the biggest risks to your behavioral health is putting off treatment that could not only get you feeling better sooner, but also save your relationships, your career, and ultimately, your life. There are a lot of reasons we put off taking care of ourselves.

In the last Mobile Health Research Highlight we examined theory-driven mHealth research. This week we highlight three new studies evaluating mHealth interventions, as well as talk about another trend in mHealth research: the widespread use of clever acronyms.

One of the challenges of developing innovative military health applications is trying to anticipate what will appeal to both the boots on the ground and senior leaders. Here at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology (T2), we coordinate frequent focus groups and several studies to help keep current with service member needs.

Traditional health care interventions are based on theory, which helps guide the development and evaluation of those interventions. One weakness in mHealth is the lack of theory to drive the rise of innovative technology-based interventions.

If you spend any time with children you know how easy it is for them to adapt to new technology. Have you noticed toddlers trying to swipe the TV screen? How about asking you to “pause” a conversation? It’s no wonder that parents are turning to mobile devices to help supplement educational needs.

Here at T2 we’re working on helping those who work directly with patients make better use of our mobile applications. A few weeks ago, Dr.

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